LEGO Architecture meets BIM – Part 09: Schedules

July 28, 2016. By

Introduction

As designers we are often required to provide data in a schedule format. This is either provided directly on a layout sheet as a PDF, as an excel output or as a model for schedules to be setup and utilised in external tools. I believe this final workflow will become more and more common place as BIM evolves.  Continue reading

LEGO Architecture meets BIM – Part 07: Data display on drawings

June 30, 2016. By

Introduction

As we have seen in the previous post we can add data to 3D models to create Building Information Models (BIM). This data is embedded in various locations within the model. These for example are Project, Site, Building, Floor (Building Storey), Space, Zone, Component/Element, Type and System. We will see in other posts how we can access this data in the model for various uses by a variety of parties. However, in this post we will focus on how this DATA can be extracted for use in traditional drawing outputs. This data becomes INFORMATION to the reader of the drawing. Continue reading

LEGO Architecture meets BIM – Part 06: An OPEN BIM data structure

June 17, 2016. By

Introduction

This is the 6th in a series of posts about “LEGO Architecture meets BIM”. In the previous posts we have focussed on the geometry of the model for the Villa Savoye building. A Building Information Model (BIM) however also involves the important part of BIM, the ‘I’ which stands for INFORMATION. This is a crucial difference from a model that is simply been built to show a design in 3D. Continue reading

LEGO Architecture meets BIM – Part 05: Level of Detail (LOD)

May 24, 2016. By

Introduction

This blog piece looks at an important concept of Building Information Modelling – Level of Detail (or simply LOD). With both LEGO and construction projects clients will be familiar with what the final constructed ‘building’ looks like. However the final model or building undergoes a series of developments before the design is finalised. This process means that the design can be developed in the most efficient way possible. In very simple terms the more detailed a model is the more time it takes to produce. It also means more time is required to modify more detailed models. Getting the right Level of Detail at the right stage of projects is critical to not introducing waste to the process. Continue reading

LEGO Architecture meets BIM – Part 04: Objects and libraries

May 3, 2016. By

Introduction

A building information model is typically constructed using two methodologies. The first is to model using tools designed to construct specific types of elements. For example a Wall tool is used to build a Wall or a Roof tool used to build a Roof. These tools are built-in to most authoring tools. The second methodology is to use objects. Objects can be both static (i.e. they are dimensionally fixed in height, length and width and are fixed in their settings) and parametric (i.e. can be a single object used for various dimensional requirements / settings).

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LEGO Architecture meets BIM – Part 03: Visualisation and animation

April 21, 2016. By

Introduction

As we saw in the last post we can generate both 2D and 3D views of the models. The 3D model approach offers more than a ‘traditional’ approach as the model can be used to also generate visualisations (some prefer to call these Computer Generated Images (CGI for short) or Renders). Visualisations can be created from a model from any angle with geometry switched on or off as required. Continue reading

LEGO Architecture meets BIM – Part 02: Model views

April 4, 2016. By

Introduction

In the previous blog post we showed images of the 3D model we have created of the Villa Savoye from the Lego Architecture series. A 3D model is easy for all parties to understand what the proposed model will look like once ‘built’. However the industry still requires designers to produce ‘traditional’ information including plans, sections and elevations on drawing sheets.  Continue reading