IFC (Industry Foundation Classes) – Predefined Types in Autodesk Revit

November 5, 2018. By

INTRODUCTION

In this blog we are going to skip the main section on Attributes (see the next blog) and focus on one specific Attribute the Predefined Type as this is closely related to Entities.

In blog post 01 we explained that Predefined Types were the next level below Entities in determining what something is. Continue reading

IFC (Industry Foundation Classes) – Understanding Entities in Autodesk Revit

October 9, 2018. By

INTRODUCTION

Welcome back!

In the last blog I had a bit of moan and we learnt about some basic IFC principles. In this blog we’re going to take what we have learnt and apply it to the world of Revit. Therefore, if you haven’t read it please do so.

I wanted to start by giving a friendly warning – this isn’t for the faint hearted. In fact, I’ve heard it described as black magic, performed by wizards with the patience of saints. Continue reading

IFC (Industry Foundation Classes) – An introduction for Autodesk Revit users

September 25, 2018. By

HELLO EVERYONE!

After a year at Bond Bryan Digital and to coincide with our new website, it’s time I rolled up my sleeves and finally started blogging. For those who don’t know me my name is Emma and I’m an Autodesk Revit user. I’m a technician by trade and the more I used Revit over the years the more I craved structure to my information to get the best out of the software and my models. This is why I started to look at standards and ways of implementing them within Revit. In particular openBIM standards like Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) because I want my information to be as useful as possible to everyone who needs it, now and in the future. Continue reading

Testing openBIM data exchange for client specific data sets

July 24, 2018. By

Introduction

As many of you who read this blog regularly know, Bond Bryan Digital promote open standards wherever possible to exchange information between different project stakeholders. The primary methods of exchange we utilise on our projects are PDF, XLSX, IFC, COBie and BCF (and DWG if we really have to!). Many are still sceptical about information exchange using certain formats. This is particularly true of IFC (Industry Foundation Classes) which is described by ISO16739:2013. The truth though is that the IFC schema is not really to blame. The issue is that the exchange is often poor because of either poor implementation of the schema by vendors or poor implementation by users. Continue reading

LEGO Architecture meets BIM – Part 30: FM Handover

October 17, 2017. By

Introduction

When I had the original idea for the LEGO series one of the main goals was to demonstrate how open standards could be used throughout the project. Many of these processes are well documented and shared amongst the BIM community. However, little is available on how information is exchanged into Facilities Management (FM) software. Part of my aspiration for the blog was that we could use the LEGO model to demonstrate a little of this digital handover process. So the question is: What does that design and construction information from a BIM process actually look like in an FM tool? Continue reading

Filtering elements for IFC 2×3 export from ARCHICAD 18/19

February 16, 2016. By

Introduction

There are a number of things to understand when exporting an IFC model. What is often misunderstood is that an IFC file is not simply one file. IFC files are exported for different purposes so when issuing an IFC file it is important to understand the purpose of the exchange. Once you understand the needs of the recipient you can begin to filter your model for different uses. Continue reading

Exporting quantities to IFC 2×3 from ARCHICAD 18/19 models

February 4, 2016. By

Introduction

Over the past few years we have slowly been finessing our approach to data for our architectural models. The models produced by project teams are now progressing to a point where cost consultants and main contractors are seeing the opportunity to use our models to assist them to produce a detailed cost breakdown of a project. In order to produce these cost plans we need to be able to provide a well built model from both a geometry and data point of view. If we build our models correctly then we should be able to use our approach to produce the required quantities that can then be used for quantification and in turn costing. Continue reading

Filtering IFC data in an ARCHICAD 18/19 model

January 22, 2016. By

Introduction

One of the challenges faced as we move into this brave new world of information is what information we want users to complete within their models. When you first start looking at data it can be fairly daunting trying to work out what is and isn’t required. Of course we could leave this to individual users but then this creates inconsistencies between individuals, offices and projects. Without creating a standard approach it also makes it harder to set up standardised schedules and provide consistent training. Continue reading